Tiefer See vom Park Babelsberg mit Glienicker Brücke © TMB Fotoarchiv/Boettcher
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Marmorpalais und Heiliger See © SPSG/ Hagen
Marmorpalais im Neuen Garten © SPSG/ Hans Bach
Marble Palace © Jan Hoffmann
Landschaftszimmer im Marmorpalais © SPSG/ Wolfgang Pfauder
Ovaler Saal im Marmorpalais © SPSG/ Wolfgang Pfauder
Marmorpalais und Heiliger See © SPSG/ Hagen
Marmorpalais im Neuen Garten © SPSG/ Hans Bach
Marble Palace © Jan Hoffmann
Landschaftszimmer im Marmorpalais © SPSG/ Wolfgang Pfauder

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Im Neuen Garten 10
14469 Potsdam
+49 (0)331-9694200
+49 (0)331-9694107

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Marble Palace and New Garden - Majestically strolling by the Heilige See

The New Garden is located between the Heilige See (holy lake), the Jungfernsee (lake of the virgins) and Pfingstberg (Whitsuntide hill). Here, you can admire some architectural gems: the orangery, the Dutch “Etablissements” (establishments), the Schindelhaus (shingle house) and the so-called Gothic Library (built in the 18th century and housing the Prussian King Frederick William II’s collection of books). The Marble Palace in the centre of the park has been almost completely renovated and is the pinnacle with its early classical furnishings and its ornate arches, which have a different design in nearly every room. In 1786, Frederick William II gave the order for the New Garden and the Marble Palace, whose interior conversion was delayed until 1845. First, Johann August Eyserbeck was entrusted with the task of designing the park, and Peter Joseph Lenné from 1815 onwards, while Carl von Gontards undertook the architectural planning of the palace at first, and Carl Gotthard Langhans later on.
The New Garden is located between the Heilige See (holy lake), the Jungfernsee (lake of the virgins) and Pfingstberg (Whitsuntide hill). Here, you can admire some architectural gems: the orangery, the Dutch “Etablissements” (establishments), the Schindelhaus (shingle house) and the so-called Gothic Library (built in the 18th century and housing the Prussian King Frederick William II’s collection of books). The Marble Palace in the centre of the park has been almost completely renovated and is the pinnacle with its early classical furnishings and its ornate arches, which have a different design in nearly every room. In 1786, Frederick William II gave the order for the New Garden and the Marble Palace, whose interior conversion was delayed until 1845. First, Johann August Eyserbeck was entrusted with the task of designing the park, and Peter Joseph Lenné from 1815 onwards, while Carl von Gontards undertook the architectural planning of the palace at first, and Carl Gotthard Langhans later on.
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All information, times and prices are verified and updated on a regular basis. Nonetheless, we cannot assume responsibility for the accuracy of the data. Prior to your visit, we recommend you request the latest information via telephone, email or from the internet pages of the respective provider.
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